What would you do if you were 29 and found you may only have a few years to live?

    So Much So Fast is about the remarkable events set in motion when Stephen Heywood discovers he has ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) and his brother Jamie becomes obsessed with finding a cure.

    From Oscar-nominated directors Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan comes a black-humored cliffhanger of romance, outsider science and the meaning of time.

    Produced in association with PBS Frontline, ZDF/ARTE, BBC Storyville & TV2/Danmark

    Wendy and Stephen Heywood in So Much So Fast

    Sundance official selection

    Independent Film Festival Boston

    Hot Docs Toronto

    Full Frame Film Festival official selection

    IDA Docuweek

    Woods Hole film Festival best of festival

    Vancouver Film Festival

    Melbourne Film Festival

    Independent Feature Project Official Selection

    Nashville Film Festival

    Video Librarian Best Documentary

    Ben, Stephen and Jamie Heywood in So Much So Fast film

    “Triumphant! A story that keeps expanding until it seems to fill the universe. Unforgettable.” Four stars.  – Ty Burr,  Boston Globe

    Gripping, intimate, complex and dramatic.” -  Sundance Daily Insider

    “The filmmakers sustain an atmosphere of relentless forward motion. A perceptive portrait of an entire family in revolt against fate.”
    - New York Times

    “Humorous. Impressive. Effortlessly profound.” - Slant Magazine

    “Director-writers Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan have created a beautiful film that unfolds like a thriller. Profound questions sneak up on you almost without you realising it.” -  The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)

    “Elegantly presents both a critique and a celebration of American optimism.” Grade A-     Entertainment Weekly

    Stephen Heywood in So Much So Fast film

    Jamie Heywood in So Much So Fast film

    CLICK TO EXPAND:
    “Triumphant! A story that keeps expanding until it seems to fill the universe. Unforgettable.” Four stars - Ty Burr, The Boston Globe

    “Jaw-droppingly good. Oscar-worthy. You’ll be hearing a lot about So Much So Fast.” - Geoffrey Kleinman, Air America

    “The filmmakers sustain an atmosphere of relentless forward motion. A perceptive portrait of an entire family in revolt against fate.” - Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times

    “Director-writers Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan have created a beautiful film that unfolds like a thriller. Profound questions sneak up on you almost without you realising it.” – Clare Morgan, The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia)

    Gripping, intimate, complex and dramatic.” - Claiborne Smith, Sundance Daily Insider

    “Filmed with insight, tenderness and even a little black humour, the aptly titled So Much So Fast is concerned with the ‘intimacy of bad luck’, but is truly about love, courage and discovery.” - Simon Horsford, The Telegraph (London)

    “Humorous. Impressive. Effortlessly profound.” - Nick Schager, Slant Magazine.

    “Elegantly presents both a critique and a celebration of American  ptimism.” Grade A-  Scott Brown, Entertainment Weekly

    Compelling.” Michelle Archer, USA Today 

    “Amazing. A 2006 Sundance favorite in the documentary category. It makes the concept of fictional narrative drama seem just a little bit ridiculous.”  Five Stars. - Tim Cogshell, Box Office Magazine

    “As intimate a movie as one could imagine. Steve Ascher and Jeanne Jordan mine such fresh feelings from what might in other hands have been a predictable story. And the Heywoods, for all their trouble, are never objects of pity, but rather of an existential nobility.” - John Anderson, Variety

    “A gloriously subversive sense of humor.” - Talha Burki , The Lancet 

    “Packed with a striking, full range of emotion. Completely, perfectly balanced in its approach. Grade A.” - Audrey Rock-Richardson, Tooele Transcript-Bulletin 

    “One of the most compelling, emotionally resonant films in years.” – David Walker, Willamette Week

    The film is no maudlin pity-fest: It’s an absorbing account of fraternal love and obsession…  Condensing years of filming down to 87 minutes makes every cut register with a pang of mortality: The temporal ellipses swipe away precious weeks and months in a flicker.  Stephen makes a brave and candid subject—sometimes hilariously so. Asked what advice he’d give himself if he could go back in time before the diagnosis—the kind of question that begs a wet-eyed response—the nearly immobile Stephen murmurs, “Have more sex on film.” Jim RidleyThe Village Voice


    “Both deeply sad and profoundly joyous.” - Rebecca Alvin, The Cape Codder

    “Moving and Funny! Dark humor is one of the strongest threads in ”So Much So Fast.” - Rhonda Stewart, Boston Globe 

    “Smart and probing. A must-see favorite!” - starred review, Baltimore City Paper

    “The humble people doing extraordinary things portrayed in So Much So Fast awed me. As I watched them move their mountains, the superb storytelling sparked new perspectives on my own life, which is a grand feat for a film.” - Agnes Varnum, RealScreen /Agnes Varnum.com

    WORLDWIDE BROADCASTS

    United States – FRONTLINE, PBS
    United Kingdom – BBC STORYVILLE
    Germany – ZDF
    France – ARTE
    Denmark – TV 2
    Australia – SBS
    Belgium – VRT
    Canada – CBC
    Israel – YES
    Sweden – SVT

    THEATRICAL SCREENINGS

    MINNEAPOLIS, MN
    Riverview Theater

    AMHERST, MA
    Amherst Cinema

    SAN JOSE, CA
    Camera 12
    CAMBRIDGE, MA
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    COLUMBUS, OH
    Wexner Center for the Arts

    THESSALONIKI DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL
    Greece

    IOWA CITY, IA
    Bijou Theater
    WORCESTER, MA
    Cinema 320
    PORTLAND, OR
    Hollywood Theater
    BOSTON, MA
    Coolidge Corner Theater

    SALT LAKE CITY
    Tower Theater

    PARK CITY, UT
    Sundance Screening Series

    BOSTON
    West Newton Cinema
    On screen for 9 weeks!

    CHICAGO
    Gene Siskel Film Center

    SAN FRANCISCO
    Roxie Cinema

    ELDORA, IA
    Grand Theater

    AUSTIN, TX
    Drafthouse Cinemas Lake Creek

    CUCALORIS FILM FESTIVAL
    Wilmington, NC
    FT. WAYNE, IN
    Fort Wayne Cinema Center

    SALEM, OR
    The Salem Cinema

    NEW YORK
    Village East Theater

    FORT WORTH, TX
    The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

    SILVER SPRING, MD
    AFI Silver Theater

    INDIANAPOLIS, IN
    Key Cinemas
    AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL IN MOSCOW

    VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

    ROCHESTER, NY
    The Little Theater

    HOT SPRINGS, AR
    Behind the Mall Cinema

    KANSAS CITY, MO
    Screenland Theater
    LOS ANGELES – IDA DOCUWEEK – HOLLYWOOD
    MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

    WOODS HOLE FILM FESTIVAL
    Winner – Best of Festival!
    PROVINCETOWN FILM FESTIVAL

    LAKE PLACID FILM FORUM
    HOT DOCS – TORONTO

    MARYLAND FILM FESTVAL
    FULL FRAME FILM FESTIVAL

    INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL BOSTON
    Audience Award Winner!

    NASHVILLE FILM FESTIVAL
    FLORIDA FILM FESTIVAL
    WORLD PREMIERE – SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL
    Documentary Competition

    From the Academy Award nominated directors of Troublesome Creek, Steven Ascher & Jeanne Jordan, comes a new documentary film, So Much So Fast. A black-humored cliffhanger of romance, guerrilla science and the redefinition of time, So Much So Fast unfolds like a nonfiction novel.  Stephen Heywood finds out he has ALS. His brother Jamie becomes obsessed with finding a cure. And the woman who’s falling in love with Stephen has a decision to make.

    ***
    When asked what he would do differently in the five years since his ALS diagnosis, Stephen Heywood replied, “Have more sex on film.”

    What would you do if you were 29 and found you may only have a few years to live? So Much So Fast is about the remarkable events set in motion when Stephen Heywood discovered he had the paralyzing neural disorder ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease).

    Made over 5 years, So Much So Fast tracks one family’s ferocious response to an orphan disease: the kind of disease drug companies ignore because not there’s not enough profit in curing it. In reaction, and with no medical background, Stephen’s brother Jamie creates a research group and in two years builds it from three people in a basement to a multi-million dollar ALS mouse facility. Finding a drug in time becomes Jamie’s all-consuming obsession.

    Stephen’s position is you can’t live every day like it’s your last (since you’d be hung over every morning). Instead, he gets married, has a son and rebuilds two houses. He and his wife Wendy’s laser-like observations of the world and their predicament go to the heart of the fragility of being alive.

    Filmmakers Ascher and Jordan were inducted into the stunning world of ALS when Jeanne’s mother, who is featured in their film Troublesome Creek, came down with the disease. Like the Jordan family of Troublesome Creek, the Heywoods are smart, acerbic and capable of upending the cliches of their situation with black humor and real insight.

    So Much So Fast makes tangible the bonds between parents and children, husbands and wives, and siblings who are also best friends. We watch as some of these bonds withstand unimaginable pressure and others break. Audiences get an inside view of scientific discovery and what happens when a group of researchers goes up against the scientific establishment.

    In So Much So Fast there’s a lot going on under the surface. It’s about the biggest questions of life. The answers are never what you’d expect.

    Interviews with the Filmmakers

    Washington Post live chat after Frontline Broadcast

    Frontline Interview

     

    Directors’ Statement

    The first film we collaborated on was Troublesome Creek, released in 1996, about Jeannie’s family and their struggle to hold onto their Iowa farm. It was the most personal of subjects, but our hope was that the very specific details of the Jordans’ lives could be made to resonate with universal themes about family, American history, economics, impermanence. We set out to overturn audience expectations about the cliches of Rural Americana, and tell a story people anywhere could see as their own.

    As bad luck would have it, So Much So Fast is a logical extension of Troublesome Creek. It begins with Jeannie’s mother, Mary Jane Jordan, who was diagnosed with ALS just as we were finishing the editing of Troublesome Creek. At that time there were no drugs or treatments for ALS, and no reason to harbor even a shred of hope. The fact that ALS (one of many orphan diseases) is still fatal represents one of the deepest failures of the profit-driven pharmaceutical industry.

    We had been looking for a way to express the jaw-dropping impossibility of ALS through film, and in 2000 we came across the Heywoods’ story in a New Yorker profile by Pulitzer Prize winner Jon Weiner (Jon recently published My Brother’s Keeper, a full length book about the Heywoods and their foundation.)

    In the Heywoods we saw another chance to explicate universals in the particulars of one family’s story. There is tremendous vitality in the multiple threads of their experience. Robert Warshow’s essays on the gangster and the westerner capture something of the duality between Jamie and Stephen. Jamie is a provocateur, whose enormous ambition and in-your-face style make it possible create his organization from thin air and build it to the small empire it becomes. But he pays a price for it. Meanwhile Stephen’s artistic, self-contained charisma gives him an acceptance of his situation and a kind of moral force reminiscent of a reluctant gunslinger. In Troublesome Creek, westerns were a kind of touchstone for Russ Jordan. For the Heywood brothers, the constant in their lives is video games – like Diablo II and Starcraft.

    For us, one of the most powerful aspects of documentary filmmaking is the ability to capture the passage of time, and reveal how real life plays out in its complexity over a span of years. We look for the layers of meaning in big moments and everyday events.

    As filmmakers we share a love for the inherent drama of documentary and the lucid, documentary-like moments in dramas. So Much So Fast is a documentary, but we hope audiences will experience it in some ways as a nonfiction novel.

    — Steven Ascher & Jeanne Jordan

    The last scenes in the film were filmed in July 2004. After that, Stephen finished a beautiful renovation of the carriage house seen in the film. He took part in an experimental program using sensors implanted in his brain to control a computer cursor with his thoughts. He made significant contributions to the development of this remarkable technology, called BrainGate, which may someday provide patients with degenerative diseases unprecedented ability to interact with the world.

    Click here to see video of Stephen working on BrainGate.

    In 2006, Ben and Sherie had a daughter, Elliot Isabel. Both Alex (Stephen and Wendy’s son) and Zoe (Jamie and Melinda’s daughter) turned six.

    In November of 2006, the tube of Stephen’s respirator detached accidentally during the night, causing cardiac arrest. He died on Sunday, November 26 at the age of 37. His last act was to donate his kidneys for transplant. Until the last, he lived a full life every day with Wendy and Alex.

    The Heywoods are strengthened by the support they’ve received from far and wide.

    The foundation is now the ALS Therapy Development Institute. They have partnered with the MDA in a major new research initiative to examine the causes of ALS at the most fundamental level. More information can be found at www.ALS.net.

    ****

    For Interviews and Updates from the Heywoods click here.

    *****
    November 2006
    From Jamie:

    Dear Friends,

    Friday morning at 5:30 I received the call from Wendy that I have gone to bed each night hoping would never happen.  I could tell from the sound of her voice that this one was different.  When I arrived, their small street was lit up with the flashing lights of two fire trucks, an ambulance, and the police.  Going inside past Wendy holding Alex in her arms and into his bedroom I found Stephen.  His vent had disconnected, his lips were blue and despite aggressive CPR he looked peaceful perhaps with even a slight trace of a smile. I rode to Newton Wellesley with the ambulance driver who also grew up in Newton and remembered Stephen from other visits.

    Between his caregiver Nicole and the EMT’s, Stephen had CPR for over 40 min.  I don’t know if it is because he forgot that he was sick or because his heart is larger and stronger than any I have ever known but it restarted.  You could actually see the disbelief on the ER team’s faces.  You also knew that they were not sure this was a good thing because Stephen’s eyes were not responding at all.  They wanted to make sure we understood how bad it was but they missed Stephen’s point as people often do.

    Stephen would tell a joke about wanting to die a heroic death.  It went something like this.  There would be a fire and he would save someone but it would have be a slow fire with ramps because he would be in a wheelchair.  I think he found a way to do that.

    There is no blood flow to either hemisphere of his brain and he has no EEG signals.  Stephen is gone, left in our hearts and in the relationships and structures he has built. Stephen was in command of his world and his body at all times and never lived life on anything other than his own terms.  Thursday night before bed he sent an email to Ben saying how wonderful our Thanksgiving was.  It was a wonderful Thanksgiving.

    Stephen has kept his body alive so that his family and friends could gather and say goodbye.  As Stephen indicated he wanted to he will donate his organs to others to give them a chance at the amazing years of life that he gave us. Sometime over the next few days if it is possible some very lucky person will get his heart.

    So he found his slow fire and it has ramps.

    FILM STILLS & POSTER

    To download hi res files, click on an image which will open it in a new window.  Then right click (or ctl click) on the image and select “save image as” to save to your hard drive.

    CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PDF OF PRESS NOTES
    So Much So Fast Press Notes

    SO MUCH SO FAST

    a film by

    Steven Ascher & Jeanne Jordan

    directors of
    TROUBLESOME CREEK
    ( Oscar nominee and winner of
    Sundance Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award)

    87 minutes

    A West City Films production


    Synopsis

    From Oscar-nominated directors Steven Ascher & Jeanne Jordan
    (Troublesome Creek) comes a black-humored cliffhanger of romance,
    guerrilla science and the redefinition of time.

    So Much So Fast is about the remarkable events set in motion
    when Stephen Heywood discovers he has ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
    and his brother Jamie becomes obsessed with finding a cure.

    *********
    When asked what he would do differently in the five years since his ALS diagnosis, Stephen Heywood replied, “Have more sex on film.”

    What would you do if you were 29 and found you may only have a few years to live? So Much So Fast is about the remarkable events set in motion when Stephen Heywood discovered he had the paralyzing neural disorder ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease).

    Made over 5 years, So Much So Fast tracks one family’s ferocious response to an orphan disease: the kind of disease drug companies ignore because not there’s not enough profit in curing it.

    In reaction, and with no medical background, Stephen’s brother Jamie creates a guerilla-science research group and in two years builds it from three people in a basement to a multi-million dollar ALS mouse facility, the largest anywhere. Finding a drug in time becomes Jamie’s all-consuming obsession.

    Stephen’s position is you can’t live every day like it’s your last (since you’d be hung over every morning). Instead, he gets married, has a son and rebuilds two houses. He and his wife Wendy’s laser-like observations of the world and their predicament go to the heart of the fragility of being alive.

    Oscar-nominated filmmakers Ascher and Jordan were inducted into the stunning world of ALS when Jeanne’s mother, who is featured in their film Troublesome Creek, came down with the disease. Like the Jordan family of Troublesome Creek, the Heywoods are smart, acerbic and capable of upending the cliches of their situation with black humor and real insight.

    So Much So Fast makes tangible the bonds between parents and children, husbands and wives, and siblings who are also best friends. We watch as some of these bonds withstand unimaginable pressure and others break. Audiences get an inside view of scientific discovery and what happens when a group of researchers goes up against the scientific establishment.

    In So Much So Fast, there’s a lot going on under the surface. It’s about the biggest questions of life. The answers are never what you’d expect.

     

    Directors’ Statement

    The first film we collaborated on was Troublesome Creek, released in 1996, about Jeannie’s family and their struggle to hold onto their Iowa farm. It was the most personal of subjects, but we blended Jeannie’s insider’s perspective and Steve’s view as an outsider. Our hope was that the very specific details of the Jordans’ lives could be made to resonate with universal themes about family, American history, economics, impermanence. We set out to overturn audience expectations about the cliches of Rural Americana, and tell a story people anywhere could see as their own.

    As bad luck would have it, So Much So Fast is a logical extension of Troublesome Creek. It begins with Jeannie’s mother, Mary Jane Jordan, who was diagnosed with ALS just as we were finishing the editing of Troublesome Creek. At that time there were no drugs or treatments for ALS, and no reason to harbor even a shred of hope. The fact that ALS (one of many orphan diseases) is still fatal represents a deep failure of the profit-driven pharmaceutical industry.

    We had been looking for a way to express the jaw-dropping impossibility of ALS through film, and in 2000 we came across the Heywoods’ story in a New Yorker profile by Pulitzer Prize winner Jon Weiner (Jon then published My Brother’s Keeper, a full-length book about the Heywoods and the early research of their ALS Therapy Development Foundation.)

    In the Heywoods we saw another chance to explicate universals in the particulars of one family’s story. There is tremendous vitality in the multiple threads of their experience. Robert Warshow’s essays on the gangster and the westerner capture something of the duality between Jamie and Stephen. Jamie is a provocateur, whose enormous ambition and brash, in-your-face style make it possible build the foundation up from nothing to the small empire it becomes. But he pays a price for it. Meanwhile Stephen’s artistic, self-contained charisma gives him an acceptance of his situation and a kind of moral force reminiscent of a reluctant gunslinger. In Troublesome Creek, westerns were a kind of touchstone for Russ Jordan. For the Heywood brothers, the constant in their lives is video games – like Diablo II and Starcraft.

    For us, one of the most powerful aspects of documentary filmmaking is the ability to capture the passage of time, and reveal how real life plays out in its complexity over a span of years. We look for the layers of meaning in big moments and everyday events.

    As filmmakers we share a love for the inherent drama of documentary and the lucid, documentary-like moments in dramas. So Much So Fast is a documentary, but we hope audiences will experience it in some ways as a nonfiction novel.

    — Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan

     

    Biographies

    STEVEN ASCHER AND JEANNE JORDAN have been making documentary and fiction films for over 20 years. Their first collaboration, Troublesome Creek: a Midwestern, won the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award at Sundance, the Prix Italia, Peabody and IDA awards and was nominated for an Academy Award. They have collaborated on Emmy-winning portraits of artists, including Chuck Close and Shimon Attie. Jordan’s work includes Eyes on the Prize, films for American Playhouse and she is currently series producer of PBS’s Postcards From Buster. Ascher’s directing credits include many films for television, TV spots and the drama, Del and Alex. He is author of The Filmmaker’s Handbook, a bestselling text.

    Composer SHELDON MIROWITZ has scored more than fifty film and TV projects and hundreds of commercials. He’s a three-time Emmy Award nominee for best music, including the seven-part series Columbus and The Age of Discovery, the six-part series Evolution, and the A&E movie The Nazi Officer’s Wife. Steve and Jeannie have had an ongoing collaboration with Sheldon since his brilliant work on the score for Troublesome Creek.

     

    Appearing in the film:

    STEPHEN HEYWOOD
    A designer-builder and video game fanatic once described as “a hunky, poet-carpenter guy.” Diagnosed with ALS at 29. Moved back to his hometown near Boston ( Newton, MA), married Wendy and became father of Alex at 30.

    JAMIE HEYWOOD
    Stephen’s two-year older brother. Entrepreneur with no training in biology who quit his job to start the ALS Therapy Development Foundation. Married to Melinda and father of Zoe.

    BEN HEYWOOD
    Youngest and tallest Heywood brother. Built a house with Stephen and then went to Los Angeles to be a producer. Torn between his west-coast life and being with Stephen back in Boston. Marries Sherie Yearton during the making of the film.

    WENDY STACY HEYWOOD
    Stephen’s wife and mother of Alex. Born and raised in Missouri, she had her first date with Stephen after his early symptoms had appeared. A great mimic who can find the humor in almost anything.

    MELINDA MARSH HEYWOOD
    Jamie’s wife and mother of Zoe. A belly dancer and circus performer with a doctorate in medieval French literature. Star of the Heywood’s annual Bellydance Fundraiser.

    PEGGY HEYWOOD
    Mother of the Heywood boys. Works with Stephen on construction projects and keeps things running with childcare and anything that needs doing. Queen of multi-tasking and power naps.

    JOHN HEYWOOD
    Father, born in England. Teaches automotive engineering at MIT and passed down a love of engineering to his sons. Takes on all the work he can to pay for things insurance doesn’t.

    ROBERT BONAZOLI
    He and Stephen were friends in high school and, as co-founder, he signed on to build the Foundation up from zero. As Deputy Director, Robert manages the people side of the Foundation.

    KEN THOMPSON
    Lab manager. Stephen’s best friend from childhood who came to work in the mouse lab when Stephen got sick. Ken’s a key part of video game night. He and Stephen regularly go out to the movies and raise their kids together.

    THE STAFF OF THE ALS THERAPY DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE
    ALS TDI began with a bold attempt at using gene therapy to cure ALS. Remaining focused on ALS patients alive today (and the time pressure implied by that) they created a streamlined process to test potential ALS drugs in mice on a large scale, and a public information program on cutting-edge therapies. Their drug testing has focused primarily on FDA approved drugs (that can be given to patients immediately if found to be effective) and they remain committed to an open science model of sharing results directly though the web with patients and researchers.  In 2006, they began a new research initiative with the MDA.. More information can be found at www.ALS.net.

    ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease)
    Also known as Motor Neuron Disease (MND). A neurodegenerative disease that causes paralysis by killing the nerves cells that control motion and movement. A few hundred thousand people worldwide have it at any time (including Stephen Hawking). Average life expectancy after diagnosis is 2-5 years, which may be extended for patients choosing to go on a respirator. Stephen, like 90% of people with ALS, has the sporadic form, for which no cause or cure is known (this form is not inheritable).

     

    Credits (for full credits, click here)

    Produced, Directed and Written by: Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan

    Cinematography: Steven Ascher

    Editing: Jeanne Jordan

    Music: Sheldon Mirowitz

    A production of West City Films in association with WGBH/FRONTLINE, ZDF/ARTE, BBC Storyville with support from TV2/Danmark.

    Produced with support from: Michael W. McCarthy Foundation, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, LEF Foundation, , Shelby Cullom Davis Foundation, Wellspring Foundation.

    Produced, directed and written by
    STEVEN ASCHER & JEANNE JORDAN

    Cinematography
    STEVEN ASCHER

    Editing
    JEANNE JORDAN

    Music
    SHELDON MIROWITZ

    Guitar
    DUKE LEVINE

    Vocals
    ARDYS FLAVELLE

    Composer’s Assistant
    ANDREAS BJORCK

    Best Boy
    JORDAN ASCHER

    Family Photographs
    JOHN HEYWOOD

    Family Movies
    WENDY HEYWOOD, WENDY WILSON

    Sound at first belly dance
    JOHN OSBORNE

    Scientific Illustration
    JENNIFER FAIRMAN

    Transcripts
    MULBERRY STUDIO, JANICE STEVENS

    Title Design
    DONNA MEGQUIER, PATRICK GASPAR

    Color Correction & Online
    MICHAEL AMUNDSON

    Online Edit
    THE OUTPOST

    Re-recording Mixer
    RICHARD BOCK

    Digital-to-35mm Transfer
    ALPHA CINE LAB

    Producers’ Representative
    LOUISE ROSEN

    Legal Counsel
    SANDRA FORMAN

    Fiscal Agent
    CALLIOPE FILM RESOURCES

    SPECIAL THANKS:
    Dan Algrant
    Bill and Cat Anderson
    Alexandra Anthony
    Dick Bartlett
    Donita Boddie
    Joan Brooks
    Robert Brown, M.D., D.Phil.
    Christina Cahill
    David Carbone
    Peter Carey
    Peggy and Stanley Charren
    Stephanie Clipper
    Randall Conrad
    Merit Cudkowicz, M.D., M.Sc.
    Christine Dall
    Tory Davis
    Victoria Garvin Davis
    Fran & Jan Delaney
    David & Melody Dorfman
    Christopher Eckman
    Jan Egleson
    Natatcha Estebanez
    Gaiam
    Ardys Flavelle
    Rev. Miriam Gelfer
    Jim Garrels
    Alexa Goldstein
    Steven Gullans, Ph.D.
    Grace Episcopal Church
    Ruth Hammell
    Rick & Marlene Guttenberg
    Chantal Kovach
    Bob Hawk
    Lyda Kuth
    Liz Kramer
    Donna Langman
    Charles Ladlow
    Steve & Martha Lewis
    Paola Leone, Ph.D.
    Ian MacConnell
    Christopher Lydon
    Brian McCarthy
    Massachusetts General Hospital
    Patrick C. McCarthy
    Patrick M. McCarthy
    Peter & Hilary McGhee
    Carolyn McGoldrick
    Rob Misasi
    Duncan Moss
    Robb Moss
    Peter Mueller
    Bill & Jennifer Nichols
    John Osborne
    Elise Pettus
    Charles and Lucille Plotz
    Robert Rodnitsky, M.D.
    Jeffrey Rothstein, M.D., Ph.D.
    Martin Schoeller
    Kim Schmidt
    Jonathan Schwartz
    Susanne Simpson
    Brad Snodgrass
    Robert & Kristina Snyder
    Society for Neuroscience
    Lisa Stewart
    Charles and Sarah Stuart
    Talamas Company
    Shaleen Tethal
    Jim & Susan Tobey
    Ken Thompson
    Underworld : Karl Hyde, Rick Smith & Darren Emerson
    Geoff Jukes, V2 Music, Sherlock Holmes, BMG, Chrysalis
    Andria Winther
    Jonathan Weiner
    Rodney Yee

    The staff of the ALS Therapy Development Institute

    For WGBH:
    PETER MCGHEE
    JOHN WILLIS
    MARGARET DRAIN
    DAVID FANNING
    MICHAEL SULLIVAN

    For ZDF/ ARTE:
    ANNE EVEN

    For BBC Storyville:
    NICOLAS FRASER

    Produced with support from:
    MICHAEL W. MCCARTHY FOUNDATION

    RADCLIFFE INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDY

    LEF FOUNDATION

    SHELBY CULLOM DAVIS FOUNDATION

    WELLSPRING FOUNDATION

    A production of
    WEST CITY FILMS

    In association with
    WGBH/FRONTLINE, ZDF, ARTE, BBC
    with support from
    TV2/Danmark

    Released theatrically by
    BALCONY RELEASING

    SO MUCH SO FAST
    ©MMVI, West City Films, Inc.

     

    SEE THE FILM

    “Watching this video makes you proud to be human.” - Amazon purchaser

    Stephen and Alex Heywood in So Much So Fast film

    Official film site – SO MUCH SO FAST – a film by Steven Ascher and Jeanne Jordan